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The Jerusalem Talmud: A Translation And Commentary =LINK=


A modern edition and commentary, known as Or Simchah, is currently being prepared in Beersheba; another edition in preparation, including paraphrases and explanatory notes in modern Hebrew, is Yedid Nefesh. The Jerusalem Talmud has also received some attention from Adin Steinsaltz, who planned a translation into modern Hebrew and accompanying explanation similar to his work on the Babylonian Talmud before his death.[18] So far only Tractates Pe'ah and Shekalim have appeared.[19]




The Jerusalem Talmud: A Translation and Commentary


Download File: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Fvittuv.com%2F2uf4GQ&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw2g5HoSMadOaBqBBgcElQ6z



The original text of the Jerusalem Talmud is here established on the basis of the editio princeps and the existing manuscripts. The text is fully vocalized. This edition also presents the first English scholarly translation and commentary of the Jerusalem Talmud. All technical terms and syllogisms are explained. The edition will serve as a necessary foundation for the understanding of all rabbinic tradition once the entire Talmud has been commented.


The Jerusalem Talmud, or Yerushalmi, is a commentary on the oral law (the Mishnah) of Israel that ties that oral law to the written law (the Torah, the Hebrew Scripture). Completed about 200 years prior to The Babylonian Talmud. Now all thirty-nine Yerushalmi tractates, as translated by Professor Neusner and Tzvee Zahavy, have been brought together in a single searchable resource. In addition to a preface and general introduction to the whole work, Professor Neusner has provided fresh and helpful introductions to each of the tractates. He has also provided within his translation the references to Bible verses alluded to in the Yerushalmi.


The 17 volumes of the Jerusalem Talmud, established on the basis of the editio princeps and existing manuscripts, were published within the series Studia Judaica between 1999 and 2015. The text presents the first English scholarly translation and commentary of the Jerusalem Talmud. For the first time, the complete edition is published in paperback. In addition, the four orders can be purchased separately each as individual sets and each volume is also separately available as paperback.


Jacob Neusner completed this monumental American translation and commentary of The Jerusalem Talmud in the last decade, but until now it has been expensive and difficult to obtain. Now all thirty-nine Yerushalmi tractates as translated by Professor Neusner and Tzvee Zahavy are available in Accordance. In addition to a preface and general introduction to the whole work, Professor Neusner has provided fresh and helpful introductions to each of the tractates. He has also provided within his translation the references to Bible verses alluded to in the Yerushalmi.


This module contains the full content of the translation, commentary on most of the tractates, and introductions to each. It scrolls in parallel with the Mishna, and shows both Mishna and Scripture references in the instant details and as hyperlinks.


The Jerusalem Talmud, or Yerushalmi, or Talmud of the Land of Israel, is a commentary on the oral law (the Mishnah) of Israel that ties that oral law to the written law (the Torah, the Hebrew Scripture). Completed about 200 years prior to The Babylonian Talmud (Bavli), it records the first such compilation of Jewish scholarly thought.Jacob Neusner completed this monumental American translation and commentary of The Jerusalem Talmud in the last decade, but until now it has been expensive and difficult to obtain. Now all thirty-nine Yerushalmi tractates, as translated by Neusner and Tzvee Zahavy have been brought together in this CD-ROM. In addition to a preface and general introduction to the whole work, Professor Neusner has provided fresh and helpful introductions to each of the tractates. He has also provided within his translation the references to Bible verses alluded to in the Yerushalmi. This electronic edition contains the full content of the translation, commentary on most of the tractates, and introductions to each. Enabling instantaneous searches by word or phrase, the CD-ROM edition has exceptional research capabilities-and opens swift avenues for exploration and discovery. It is essential electronic material for all who take the religous background of the Old and New estaments seriously.


"In two different ways, this CD-ROM English translation of the Talmud of the Land of Israel ("Yerushalmi," "Jerusalem Talmud," "Palestinian Talmud") 175 presents an important contribution to the study of the Talmudic literature. Its first importance is as a critical translation of and commentary to this central text of early Judaism. Neusner's remains the only complete English translation of and commentary to this fourth-fifth century CE rabbinic text.


"The CD-ROM's second importance is in making Neusner's groundbreaking work on this text available and readily accessible. His English translation of the Jerusalem Talmud originally was published between 1982 and 1994 by the University of Chicago Press, in thirty-five volumes (thirteen of the Yerushalmi's tractates were translated by scholars other than Neusner). That translation, excluding ten of the eleven tractates of the Division of Agriculture, served as the foundation for a second publication, Neusner's The Talmud of the Land of Israel: An Academic Commentary to the Second, Third and Fourth Divisions, published in 1998 by Scholars Press, in twenty-eight volumes. While the translation and commentary presented in this new CD-ROM edition thus have been available for a decade and more, the immense size of the work has meant that, despite its importance, until now it has been found almost exclusively in research libraries. This CD-ROM edition for the first time makes a complete English translation of the Talmud of the Land of Israel readily available to scholars and a general audience interested in Jewish history, law, and thought.


The Jerusalem Talmud: A Translation and Commentary on CD-ROM is a valuable addition to the corpus of rabbinic texts now available in electronic format. For the Babylonian Talmud, this includes Neusner's The Babylonian Talmud: A Translation and Commentary on CD-ROM, also published by Hendrickson, and the just mentioned Soncino Classics Edition. For the Jerusalem Talmud, Neusner's translation is the only option. But this is hardly an issue when the translation and commentary are as accurate, complete, and accessible as they are made to be here."--Biblical Theology Bulletin


Print editions (Large, color (8.5" x 11.5") or Medium B & W (7.5" x 10") and Paperback ( 7.5" x 9.5") present an enhanced Vilna page, a side-by-side English translation, photographs and illustrations, a brilliant commentary, and a multitude of learning aids to help the beginning and advanced student alike actively participate in the dynamic process of Talmud study.


44 SHOFAR Winter 1995 Vol. 13, No.2 THE SECOND COMMANDMENT: "THOU SHALT NOT BOW DOWN UNTO THEM, NOR SERVE THEM, FOR I THE LORD THY GOD AM AJEALOUS GOD" by Nisan Ararat Nisan Ararat is Assistant Director of the Department of General Studies, Technion Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, and Senior Teaching Fellow (since 1988). He is the author of Truth and Kindness in the Bible (in Hebrew) Oerusalem: World Zionist Organization, 1993). I. Scripture itself states that "the ten words"! are found "on two tables of the testimony'? how these "words" are divided between the two tables, however, or what the division itself is on each table is impossible to know from the biblical verse but can be deduced from its subject matter.3 Thus we have the suggestion, which is the accepted one, to 'Exodus 31:18; 34:1, 24; Deuteronomy 4:13; 5:19; 9:10, 11; 10;1,3; First Kings 8:9. All scriptural translations were taken from The Holy Scriptures According to the Masoretic Text, A New Translation (philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society, 5725/1965) for the sake of uniformity. 2Exodus 34:25; Deuteronomy 4:13; 10:4. 3See Encyclopedia Mikrait (Biblical Encyclopedia), Vol. B, "Dibrot" (Commandments), N.Z. Cassuto; Encyclopediajudaica, Vol. V, "Decalogue" (by M. Greenberg); Mordechai Breuer, "The Division of the Decalogue into Sentences and Commandments," in Ben-Zion Segal (ed.), The Decalogue Through the Ages Oerusalem, 5746), pp. 223-254 (Hebrew); Moshe Greenberg, "The Decalogue Tradition Through the Mirror of Criticism," in The Decalogue Through the Ages, pp. 67-94; M. Y. Porat, "Calculation of the Decalogue," Bet Mikra A (5716), pp. 100-102; B. Jacob, "The JQR NS Decalogue," Vol. XIV (1923-24), pp. Tbe Second Commandment 45 divide the decalogue into two-five on each tablet-those commandments (mitzvot) on the relationship between man and God on one tablet and opposite it, on the other tablet, the mitzvot dealing with relations between man and his fellow man.4 As for the division of the five Commandments on the second tablet, there is general agreement. This rests on the literary-morphemic matter characterizing this tablet: every Commandment opens with the negative, "Thou shalt not." In contrast, there is no general agreement as to the division of the five Commandments on the first tablet.5 "Rishonim" and "Aharonim" particularly exercised themselves on the question: Should the opening words, "I am the Lord Thy God Who brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage," be included in the count of the Ten Commandments? Or is it possible that its subject matter is nothing more than a "declaration"-a kind of "introduction" for the two tablets together? 141-187; W. Harrelson, l1Je Ten Commandments and Human Rights (Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1980), p. 47 (see his table). The problematics involved in the division of the Decalogue go back a long iime. They appear in Philo's article, "On the Ten Commandments," as well as in Josephus, Antiquities, Book 3, chapter 5, and even among the Talmudic sages: Talmud Yerushalmi (Palestinian Talmud), Tractate "Berachot," ch. 1, p. 5. It appears, too, in Vayikrah Rabah, ch. 24, p. 5; Sifri Numbers, verse 112; Mechiltah d'R. Ishm-ael, Tractate "Bahodesh," ch. 8; Mechiltah d'R. Shimon barYochai; Tanhuman and Tanhuman Buber, "Kedoshim 3": Pesichta Rabati, par. 20-23: Tanah Dabai Eliyahu 24: Jerusalem Targum to the Torah; Midrash Aseret Hadibrot, and many more works. Similarly it was dealt with by exegetes in the Middle Ages, such as Ibn Ezra in his commentary to Exodus 20:1 and Deuteronomy 5:16. Echoes of the problem are heard in the different cantillation assigned to the reading: the so-called lower ("taama kadma") of Eretz Israel (the West) and the upper ("taama tenina") of Babylonia, and possibly also the later method (the so-called fourth system), as pointed out by M. Breuer, "The Division of the Decalogue." The problematics are also reflected in the counting of the commandments by the Baal Halachot Gedolot, Maimonides, Nachmanides, and others. The tradition of writing the portions (open and closed) in the Decalogue does not agree with the cantillation notes, either the upper or the lower cantillation... 041b061a72


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